Saskatchewan Entertainment Expo

This weekend I went to Saskatchewan Entertainment Expo, and that means I get to do my first Good, Bad, and Ugly report for a convention outside of Ontario! Let the games begin!

The Good

The Prairieland Park is a great venue, with a ton of space. This expo was the largest I’ve ever attended as a vendor, by far. I know Kitchener Comic Con says it gets around 9000 people, but there’s just no way those numbers can be accurate. SEE says it pulls in 12000, and it was ridiculously busy. But I think that’s the difference between selling armbands to everyone who comes in (SEE) and counting people who enter the doors of a free event (KCC). I figure KCC has to be counting people more than once, if they leave and come back later, because the foot traffic isn’t even close to the same.

I contacted SEE really late, since we just moved to Saskatoon, and I only found out about the expo recently. All the Artist Alley tables were sold out, but they fit me in to an economy vendor stall, which was much roomier than I’m used to. I need to be careful not to get too used to that sort of luxury!

Photo Credit: Jefferson Smith

Fortunately, Jefferson Smith lives in Saskatoon and generously offered to split the table with me. If you haven’t done conventions before, it’s infinitely better to have someone to share a table with. Companionship helps keep your energy levels up, not to mention you can take breaks and still have someone watching the table for you.

I met a couple local writers on the first day who invited me to their writing events. I’m not 100% sure they’re a good fit for me, one being a “writing prompt” sort of group to help with inspiration and combat writer’s block – neither are things I have problems with – and the other sounding sort of ill-defined, but they want to put together an anthology. Even so, it’s always nice to network with other writers, because writing tends to be a lone wolf sort of activity, and it’s nice to share experiences with others.

In terms of sales, I did quite well. Two people bought the full trilogy, and I sold another half dozen copies of A Noble’s Quest. That more than covered the table costs, which was great! Also, some people requested that I put the books in a local book store because they didn’t have the money to buy them at SEE, so I’ll be looking into that soon. As an unknown author in the area with no fan base, I was really pleased with those numbers. Not only that, but I had several people say they will definitely get the books on Amazon as well. Now, I don’t like to count my sales before they come, but I have a really good feeling about some of those people. The community here is exceptionally supportive of their local artists!

Overall, a fantastic convention. Large, well organized, with a good-sized list of current and past celebrities. It was wonderful. Best convention I’ve ever attended! (Although meeting Ed Greenwood at SkyCon will always stand out as a career highlight for me, and will be tough to beat!)

The Bad

Jefferson had to miss the first day entirely due to illness. That really sucks! He had quite a lot of success on the second day when he was there, and I felt he would have done great with the first day, too.

This next point is super minor, and not a knock against the convention at all… but one bad thing about being in the vendor area is that I was beside a WALL of Funkp Pop figures. It’s amazing how many people turned down our alley and simply didn’t see anything else, as their eyes were immediately grabbed by the sheer enormity of hundreds of Pops. How can a little author hope to compete with the power of pre-existing fandom collectibles? Next year I’ll get in on SEE earlier, so I can hang out in Artist Alley, where I hope my work will shine a bit more.

The Ugly

I felt so bad for the guy across from me. I mean, he had a great convention and sold a ton of comic books. He said it was the most he’d ever sold there. But he had two shelving racks that weren’t super stable looking, with REALLY expensive comics on it. One was $975. Thousands of dollars worth of comics fell to the floor, and that big one cracked. Likely cut the value in half. So painful.

The Vendors

I didn’t actually get to do much networking with vendors at this one. I talked with a couple of the people nearby, but didn’t get out of my area much at all.

Jefferson Smith shared the table with me, and has some interesting sounding fantasy books of his own! Fairly different from my stuff, by the sounds of it, but our writing processes are somewhat similar, and I bet they’re good reads. I read one of his short stories a while back, and it was highly entertaining!

Mike’s Comics (Warning: Link is to Facebook page. If you value your privacy, might have to skip this one.) was across from me, and he’s a really nice guy with a massive comic book collection. He had two booths absolutely packed with boxes of comics!

CmdStore had all the Funko Pops and way, WAY more. My son had to get a Pokemon ball from them, and had a really hard time not getting a Funko Pop. As soon as he saw them, he said he wanted to buy one, and he had to be reminded that there was an entire convention worth of stuff to look at, so he shouldn’t just get the first thing he laid eyes on.

 

A Queen’s Edict art, Empire’s Foundation trilogy volume

This month I revealed the sketch for the cover art for A Queen’s Edict! Harvey Bunda has once again done a wonderful job of capturing the character and has brought Grace Strongblade to life. Patrons got the first look, and a few days later I did a public reveal on MeWe.

“But Ryan! What about Google Plus, Facebook, Twitter, etc?”

Glad you asked. With all the privacy and data scraping concerns going on across social media, I’ve deleted both my Facebook and Twitter accounts. While Google Plus hasn’t been caught doing anything, the fact that we don’t see how they monetize their site made me feel pretty certain that they’re using our data somehow… but I guess they wanted to jump on top of the problem before it blew up, because they put together a video talking about how they use the data to target ads on sites like YouTube, but they don’t actually give the data to any third parties. So the advertisers have no idea, it’s just Google handling it all internally. So I might share stuff on Google Plus still, but as for Facebook and Twitter, I’m not going back. Honestly, I shared the promo video to show off the cover art on Google Plus, and no one even saw it. For whatever reason, despite people showing interest in the reveal, the actual reveal was swallowed up by the Google algorithm monster. So what’s the point of posting there if posts people want to see never make it to their page?

Honestly, I really like MeWe. I feel a lot happier knowing that anything my friends post comes across my Home page. Certainly, there are fewer people there right now, but I feel like there’s room for growth. G+ has been stagnant for years.. all the followers I found, I found shortly after starting, when people could share circles of people with similar interests. Since then, it’s been flat. Yes, I still have interesting conversations with people there, but I want a platform where I can easily find people, and other people can easily find me. For instance, the Genre Fiction group I started for writers and fans has been adding people steadily. At the start of the month, we were under 70 people, and now we’re up to 89. Not staggering numbers, I know, but it’s growth. And there have been a few people taking part in our weekly writing event, where we share snippets of our writing based on a theme that people vote on. So I’m happy with it!

Anyway, back to the art… half way through the month Harvey sent me a sneak peek video, showcasing the cover art with some filler text. I’m so, so happy with how it turned out. I gave him some lines from the first draft to put into the video, and he sent it to me so I could post it to my own YouTube account.

If you just want to see the art all on its own without the flashy video, that’ll be posted to my Patreon account.


In other news, work continues on Wizards’ War. I’ve nearly got a finished 2’x2′ board, and I’ve been teaching a group of friends the game, so they can teach others when they go to Origins and GenCon this summer! If you’re at either one, look for Broken Things and say ‘hi.’ They’ve got some great games they’re working on! (I really like their deck building game)


Finally, I’ve released the full Empire’s Foundation trilogy as a single volume on Amazon for the low, low price of $9.99! The books in the series have all come down in price, too.

Why?

Because I got some great news! If you’d like to find out that great news, you know where to follow me. It’s not being posted publicly, so if you’d like to know, I’ll tell you in private. But I’ve received some fantastic personal news, and am sharing my good mood by dropping prices across the board.

Toxophiles

So this month was pretty awesome. Not only has my writing started making money for the first time since I started writing, but a fan group appeared on Facebook.

Seriously.

When I was invited to join my own fan group… no words seem adequate. It was surreal seeing “Toxophiles United” and watching the group grow. At the time of publishing, it’s up to 15 likes.


On top of that, Adriel Wiggins blasted through 4 of my titles and reviewed them all on her website at the same time as she posted an interview I did with her. It was fun, and I recommend reading it if you haven’t yet! If you don’t want to go through all the reviews, here’s the short version:

A Noble’s Quest: 5 stars

1100 Before Gods’ War: 5 stars (and her favourite love story)

Demon Invasion: 4 stars (-1 star for awful demon names… seriously. Who writes a story with that many named demons? I knew this was a bad idea from the start, even if I like the story :P)

A Wizard’s Gambit: 5 stars

All of that? That’s pure author fuel! If you’ve read my books and haven’t left a review yet, those things keep me going. Plus they help other people find my stories. So head on over to Amazon and/or Goodreads and let people know what you think!


New business cards! I gave away so many of them at the first two conventions of the year that I had to get more. I’m not 100% sure they’re worth having. For the amount that you spend on them (I only pick them up when I get a good deal through VistaPrint), and the number you give out with no bites, it sometimes feels like they’re not a wise investment. But at Kitchener Comic Con, one person who took a card checked out book 1 through Amazon, and liked it enough to get the sequel. I’m sure other people have used the cards, too, but maybe just enough to break even.

After giving out all those A Noble’s Quest cards, I thought I’d move on to the next book in the series. Once they’re gone, A Hero’s Birth is next. I can’t imagine going through 250 business cards faster than I can publish books, so this strategy might just continue on for the rest of my writing career. Gotta catch ’em all, or something.


I received payment from Amazon for January, and I have to say… I’m really happy with it. See, I made as much in one month as I did all last year through Amazon sales! Now, before you think, “Whoa! You must be rolling in it!” let me just say I didn’t make a heck of a lot last year… just $40. But still, I’m competing against myself, and only myself, so I’m really excited about this, especially seeing that I’ve continued to have some sales through February and March.


Work continues on both A Queen’s Edict and Wizards’ War

The book is closing in on 85,000 words. I’m really happy with how it’s progressing.

And I’m almost done the cards for the game. I’ll be bringing it to SkyCon Light in Kitchener on April 28th, so I need to get those cards ordered soon!

SkyCon 2017

Kitchener Comic Con 2018

You know what time it is! Or maybe you’re new around here and don’t. Long story short, any time I attend a con, I like to write up a “The Good, The Bad, and The Ugly” report, partly so I remember what a con was like, so I know if I want to go again in future years, partly in case other people are wondering if that con might be good to go to as a vendor. Your mileage may vary, depending on what you’re selling…

The Good

Kitchener Comic Con is the biggest convention I go to, with hundreds, and probably thousands of people coming through the doors. It’s a free event, so you get some really interesting experiences with people wandering through who really have no idea what’s going on. They just come in to see what’s going on, and in some cases you get people coming to get out of the cold for a while. Suffice it to say, you can have some interesting conversations with colourful people! For instance, I had one guy who might’ve been around my age walk by, and I did my usual, “Hi, how are you?” and he stopped, looked at me, and said, “You’re the nicest person in this whole place. You’re the only person who’s asked me that since I got here.”

Well, shucks. I may not win any “Pushy Salesman of the Year” awards, but I’ll take, “Nicest person in this whole place” any day!

There was another older gentleman who reminded me a great deal of my wife’s father, in terms of looks. He stopped by and talked to me about this book collection he kept at home, with some original copies… misprint copies… all sorts of things. He thought I might know something about appraising them (because I sell books?) and I suggested he might try an antique store, as they’d be able to at least point him in the right direction, if they didn’t want them. We had a nice long chat, and he showed me an “original hard cover” of Attack of the Clones published by Lucas Books, written by R. A. Salvatore. I doubt that particular volume will ever be worth anything, since I don’t expect any Star Wars merchandise after Return of the Jedi will ever be worth anything, but some of the other books he talked about sounded really interesting… some of them dating back to the early 1900’s. I wish him well and hope he finds someone who has some knowledge about appraising such things.

Okay, Ryan, that’s all well and good, but how did sales go?

In a word… adequate. I mean, I do editing work for the newsletter for KCC in return for a table, so anything I sell starts making profits for me right away. Ron Hoppe was very good to me, and gave me a whole table, so I got to showcase the prototype of my board game, Wizards’ War. That generated a fair bit of interest, and I got several e-mail addresses to add to my mailing list for when I launch the Kickstarter!

Oh, sales? Right! While I was hoping to do better this year since I have my full trilogy out now, I never took into consideration that there are tiers of spending at conventions. This was something I spoke about at length with another vendor, who pointed out that he wasn’t selling big ticket items, but had quite a few smaller ones selling. As a free event, a lot of people come as a family, and the kids are looking for something cute and shiny, not really giving their parents time to browse themselves. Also – many of us parents have been there – parents prefer to get their kids something over themselves, anyway, so they might not even be looking. For many, coming out to KCC is a big deal to see all the wonderful cosplayers, and there were many in attendance! Chewbacca, Han, the Predator, Deadpool, Spiderman, Poison Ivy, Elsa, Chun-Li… just to name a few!

This knight looked awesome, too!

So having more books might have been almost detrimental. I mean, there was a ton of interest, and I went through dozens of business cards, but if you’ve done a lot of conventions, you know giving out business cards rarely translates into sales. A couple of people assured me they would definitely look for my books later, and while I hope that happens, I don’t count my unhatched chickens. Having three books out for $70 total probably looks like a big investment (it is!). I just don’t think there’s a way around that, except to start doing bigger shows where people are paying to get in the door and are looking for stuff to buy. I really like doing local conventions, but it’s time to step up to play with the big boys and girls at a larger convention, I think.

On day 1 I sold 3 books, and on day 2 I sold 4 (three of which were to one person at the end of the day). It was tough. I talked to a few people who came around my table when they first got there, really liked what they heard, but said they needed to check out the rest of the convention before making any purchases… but they’d probably be back. While I’ve had luck with that sort of thing coming through at other conventions, it just didn’t materialize this time. You win some, you lose some. I covered the cost of parking and gas, and came out with a bit extra. I had some great networking, treated myself to some vendors’ wares, and had a pretty good time in general.

The Bad

2 out of 2 cons I’ve attended this year had Trouble with Tables. When I got to KCC, they hadn’t gotten all the tables they needed. It wasn’t a long wait, fortunately, so I was set up and ready to go before the doors opened. Sometimes conventions feel like barely controlled chaos, and this one certainly had some weird stuff happen. For instance, I got to the con on Sunday and was told I was late… and I certainly wasn’t the only one. Most vendors were coming in for 11am. I remembered seeing somewhere that the show started at 11am, and ran until 4pm. But when I tried to find the information on the mobile website, I didn’t see anything. The website for KCC is bad. Like, half the time when I try to visit it, I’m redirected to some other site that looks and sounds like a virus. But when I close that, and try again, I usually get to the actual website on the second try. Even once you’re there, it’s a bit of a madman’s paradise, with a lot of stuff going on and the information you’re looking for is buried. Anyway, I just checked on my desktop (got that virus-looking page first again!!!), and it does say 11am-4pm. So I dunno why anyone would have thought it started at 10am. And then they tried to say the con went until 5pm, but the vendors were all like, “What? This ends at 4pm.” And a lot of people (myself included) packed up at 4. I’d already told my wife the show ended at 4, and the con was pretty dead by that point anyway, so I wasn’t going to drag it out another hour. I was ready to go home and get some dinner. Conventions always wipe me out (but in a good way).

The Ugly

Seriously, that website needs a total overhaul. The glitchy landing page is a major cause for concern, as I could see people panicking and not trying again.

The Amazing

I was approached by Steveo Torell from Heads or Tails Gaming, who invited me to demo Wizards’ War at his shop in Brantford, and he’s interested in stocking the game when it comes out! I still can’t believe that conversation happened. After telling him the basics of the game, he said he had some people who frequent his shop who would definitely be interested in it.

Also, The Del Morgado Show was my neighbour, and Del interviewed me a couple times. It appears that Del has fans in Germany or somewhere around there, because I picked up a couple sales from the German Amazon site! Always love reaching the international audience!

I picked up this little guy from Artisan Maille, who were right across from me! Brad and I have been friends for about a year now, having first met each other at Tri-Con last year. When I saw he was bringing these little scale dragons, I knew I had to get one. I have a healthy collection of red dragon items (maybe I’ll get them all together and take a picture some time), and this little guy is the perfect addition! It’s a pin, so I was wearing it on my pocket during the convention.

Last but certainly not least, I hit a MAJOR milestone with this show… for the first time since I started keeping track, I am now in the black!!! That’s right! Out of the hole! Any money I make going forward is going to be saved up for cover art and editing, and buying new stock. I’m off work tomorrow because I have a doctor’s appointment out of town, but when I’m home I’m going to go through my stock and see how I’m doing. I think I’ve got a fair bit left. So if there’s something you want, just let me know and I’ll set it aside for you. I can’t tell you how excited I am to finally see positive numbers come out of book sales. Thank you to everyone who’s helped me get to this point. I couldn’t have done it without your help. Sure, I do the writing, but without you guys buying my books and telling your friends, I couldn’t have gotten here. So thank you again, a million times!

Vendors

I like to point the spotlight at other great vendors I meet at these things, so here goes!

Artisan Maille – makes all sorts of amazing chainmail stuff.

Genesis: Battle of Champions – collectible card game. We’ve started the ball rolling on a future collaboration!

The Del Morgado Show – radio show every couple weeks on Mondays at 9pm. (Warning: Adult language)

Heads or Tails Gaming – gaming shop in Brantford.

Daryl J Ball – Author. He’s been supporting my work for a few years now! I met him at the second KCC, where he picked up A Noble’s Quest, and he’s been coming to see me ever since.

Williams Photography – I actually met William because he was selling comic books, not for his photography, but he’s a nice guy and maybe you need a photographer in the Cambridge area!

Dan Watt – Author. He’s got a medieval spoof novel called Dragon (The Emerald of Light) that I picked up. He says it’s a comedy in the vein of Monty Python, so I’m interested to see what that looks like!

 

Next up: Kitchener Comic Con!

On March 3rd and 4th I’ll be at Kitchener City Hall for Kitchener Comic Con! It runs from 11am to 8pm on Saturday, and 11am to 4pm on Sunday. With my full trilogy out, I’m hoping to do really well.


Some good friends have offered to bring the prototype of my board game, Wizards’ War, to Origins this year. I was so surprised when they offered… with the board game design nights at the local game cafe falling apart months ago, I haven’t done much work on it. But now I have a deadline, and I’m going to have to get some work done on it.

On the plus side, there isn’t too much that needs to be done… I have all the art for the cards, so I just need to fit that to the standard poker card size template, and write out some descriptions, which shouldn’t take long. I also need to finish designing the larger board, order it, and cut out the hexagons. That last part will be the biggest part of the job, as slicing out the hexes isn’t easy, and requires a lot of fiddly work. I’ll look into it more and see if there’s a way to get them pre-cut to save me the headache.


And before you worry that the game will pull me away from my writing (I ran a poll this month and the majority overwhelmingly want me to continue writing book 4), I’ve been writing, too. I shattered the 75,000 word mark on A Queen’s Edict, and also started writing a new project, which will be a stand alone sci-fi novel. At least, that’s my intent. If I had a bunch of people banging down my door for more, I could continue with it, I’m sure.

What are the two books about? I’m glad you asked!

A Queen’s Edict begins almost 450 years after the conclusion of A Hero’s Birth. Grace, Sardo, and Traithaius Strongblade are siblings living in Stowenguard, and on the night of Trai’s 16th birthday, they are summoned to meet the Queen. From there, they embark on a vague quest, seeking to fulfill a prophecy that might be about them, but it’s hard to tell. Even the mission is ill-defined, but they have been assured that they are to destroy the evil Lord Torrak, King of the South.

The sci-fi story, which lacks a title at this point, revolves around the discovery of an alien that’s been frozen in the arctic. With the glaciers melting, it’s found and hauled off for analysis. It appears to be closely related to humans, a potential missing link…

I’ve only written the prologue to the sci-fi story at this point, clocking in at 900 words. There’s no timeline to get it done. It’s just something fun to work on as an aside when I don’t feel like working on my other projects. It’s like procrastinating, but still working.

GenreCon 2018

You probably already know I spent the weekend at GenreCon 2018, so let’s go right ahead to the usual, shall we?

The Good

The hotel and con staff were very friendly and I had a fun weekend.

The Friday night (6-9pm) went better than I thought it would. Last year I hadn’t gotten any sales that first night, so I was pleasantly surprised to have two! Also, a trio of Jawas came running through, and one of them pawed at the character cards on my table! Jawas have always been one of my favourites from Star Wars, and seeing three of them running around acting like Jawas, looking like they were going to steal things, was so fun.

Saturday was the long day (10am-9pm) with lots of events going on, including a celebrity visit from Charisma Carpenter. She was in another part of the con, so I didn’t get to see her, but I heard good things from people who saw her. Nicholas Brendon was supposed to be there, too, but got held up at the border. That day I sold nine books, which was amazing. I had my table costs covered half way through the day, which is always a nice feeling!

I was a panelist at two panels, one on self-publishing with Sarah WaterRaven, and another on world building with Sarah again, and Tommy Gofton and Sen-Foong Lim. Both panels were a lot of fun, and well attended. I had a couple follow-up conversations with people, which were great, too! Networking at a con is worth almost as much as sales, because it’s often about who you know… for instance, I was approached by Assad, who created the Genesis: Battle of Champions collectible card game (all vendor links are at the end). We met at SkyCon last year, and chatted a bit at GenreCon. He mentioned he’s now going full-time game creation and is starting to put out feelers for working with other people – specifically authors. Now, I’m making my own board game, but I know next to nothing about CCG’s. The last one I played was the old Star Wars one from the 90’s. I’m definitely going to follow up with him and at least chat some more about this, because I want to break into gaming. With the synergy I saw happening between my books and board game prototype, I’m convinced that getting into more forms of media can only help.

Additionally, my wife and kids came and had an amazing time. They got their pictures taken with a bunch of cosplayers, from Darth Vader and Storm Troopers to FOUR Judges (from Judge Dredd). I’d share those pictures, but you know how it is…

Sunday was a shorter day (11am-4pm) and was considerably quieter, especially later in the day. I still had 4 sales, so it was a good day. The 501st was around, and it’s always cool seeing Darth Vader and Boba Fett walking through a convention.

The Bad

You know, there wasn’t anything that sticks out as being bad here. Sure, it had its quiet stretches, but I had interesting vendors to either side of me and we talked a lot to pass the time. It felt busier than last year, so you get the sense it’s growing and getting better. I’ll be interested to see what happens next year! Maybe they’ll even get some better weather! It was awful out there with lots of snow and even rain on Sunday, and I’m sure that stopped some people from coming.

I’d guess the only bad thing that happened, I wasn’t really involved with… Nicholas Brendon got stopped at the border, due to ongoing criminal investigations. I guess the con coordinators and Brendon tried to get some paperwork together to help him get across despite the charges, but they still didn’t let him across. If he’d been there, I might have spent some of my earnings on meeting him. But after I shared a post on Facebook about Brendon not coming, I learned from my cousin that Brendon has a pretty sketchy past, legally speaking. Lots of charges, including felonies. So maybe the way it worked out was for the best.

The Ugly

Nothing to put here. I had a good time.

The Great!

Launching A Hero’s Birth at the con was the right call. It was great having people coming up to the table, picking up the last book to see how the trilogy ends. I had four sales just from people I knew were coming, which covered a good chunk of the table cost by themselves. Having that sort of traffic coming in was wonderful! And Dave hung out in the area for a good part of Sunday, and cracked open his copy of A Hero’s Birth to read right beside the table. You can’t buy advertising like that – I have the best fans!

Additionally, I had a couple experiences that I HAVE to share, because they were awesome.

Two young women approached my table, one I had met at SkyCon, and she had figured her friend Nikki would like my books… so she brought Nikki over to my table and introduced us. After we talked, Nikki decided to pick up A Noble’s Quest to see what she thought.

She followed me on Twitter and posted this:

That was such an amazing feeling. But wait! There’s more! Today she came by with her nephew and while he was getting his face painted by Miss Kitty, Nikki told me that she had almost finished A Noble’s Quest already because she was having a hard time putting it down. She said she’d get A Wizard’s Gambit, because she was sure she’d be done A Noble’s Quest very soon. I offered to knock $5 off if she got A Hero’s Birth at the same time, because I usually give a discount if people get three or more books at the con. She picked it up, too! I can’t wait to hear what she thinks!

Another gentleman was walking by my table, and he almost got by me… until he noticed Harvey Bunda’s stunning artwork – specifically, Fyrsanthemar the God Crusher on the cover of A Wizard’s Gambit. He came to talk to me, and wound up getting the entire trilogy in one go when I told him I love dragons, too, and have them in all my books. What a high, right before I was headed to my first panel!

Vendors

There are a few vendors I’ve met before, and I met some new ones, too! The vendor community is great, and I like to share the spotlight with them.

Adventures of Lollipop – a comic where the characters explore Canada and the world, sometimes time travelling to teach kids about the world around them.

Artisan Maille – awesome chain mail stuff, from armour to dice bags and jewellery.

Critical Shoppe – cute RPG-inspired comic stuff.

Fire and Steel – for all your weapon needs. One day, if my books ever get BIG, I’m going to get the Strongblade mass produced for sale.

Genesis: Battle of Champions – a strategic CCG that uses a board game grid to lay out your armies.

Kyfak – local games and toys. (I meant to get over there and pick up some Star Wars Lego minifigures but forgot!)

Miss Kitty Facepainting and Entertainment – she did face painting and henna at the con, and also puts together parties.

By the numbers

I know a lot of people like to know the exact details of what I consider success. I recently increased the prices on my books, because a) I had someone approach me at a con and say, “Is that it?” when I told them A Noble’s Quest was $15, so I figured I could get away with more, and b) I need to start valuing my writing more, if it’s going to start paying for itself, allowing me to write more books. So here’s the details:

Books sold

2x A Noble’s Quest

2x A Wizard’s Gambit

8x A Hero’s Birth

3x Scoundrels anthology

2x $5 discounts for people who bought the full trilogy

Gross income: $325

Net, after printing costs and table fees: $100

That’s definitely the best I’ve ever done at a convention. Normally I’ll break even, or be a little bit over, which is great. It looks like my belief that I’d get better sales once the trilogy was finished is turning out to be true. My table looks WAY more impressive with five titles on it. While I doubt I’ll have the first book of the Strongblade Siblings series ready to go for next year, I do hope to have my board game, Wizards’ War, ready to go. Maybe that will draw in an entirely new audience, too. One thing’s for sure… if I add any more products to my table, 4 feet just won’t be big enough!

Book launch and GenreCon 2018, coming up!

This is going to be great.

I mean, if this pair of celebrities doesn’t draw in a ton of people to Guelph on the weekend of February 9th-11th, I don’t know what will. Charisma Carpenter (Cordellia) and Nicholas Brendon (Xander) of Buffy the Vampire Slayer and Angel fame are coming to GenreCon.

True story time: I always loved Xander because in a way he reminded me of me in high school. Awkward, not cool, and often unnoticed. I loved the episode where he had his own adventure going on and was on his own while everyone else dealt with a “big bad” in the background. When he was described as the one who sees, I nodded with understanding. I couldn’t remember ever having a character on a show that spoke to me as much as Xander did.

So I’m having a bit of a fanboy moment right now, because I’m excited to meet Nicholas Brendon. I even went so far as to ask my wife, “Do you think he’d make a good Erwin Winston?” She looked at me and shook her head. There was some alleged relationship issue, but by the sounds of it TMZ used an old photo and got the story wrong. Still, in this day and age that sort of story doesn’t sit well, does it? But his partner said it was misreported and there were no charges, so we need to take her at her word. After all, they wouldn’t let him leave the USA if he was in trouble with the law, would they? So let’s give him a friendly Canadian welcome!

I’m not usually one to think about what actors would play the characters in my books, but that thought got my mind rolling on other members of the Buffyverse I could see stepping into roles. Alyson Hannigan as Pellin. Alexis Denisof as Marcus. James Marsters as Arus.

While I recognize it’s all a pipe dream, it’s fun to think about these things.


I’m a speaker on a couple panels at GenreCon! Both are on Saturday February 10th, with the first at 3pm on indie publishing, and the second at 6pm on world building. These are topics that I love to talk about, and I’m hoping for a great turn out! But even if we only have one person, we’ll still go ahead with the panel. We had that happen with the indie publishing panel last year, and the person who came got some great one-on-four time with all the panelists.


At any rate, I’ve got all my paperback books ready to go, and have already started selling some books through Amazon. The official launch for A Hero’s Birth was January 20th, and I blitzed social media and was humbled by the response, with many people sharing my posts. I know I reached some new people, and was happy to hear from existing fans who were excited for the final book in the trilogy.

As is usual for me when I launch a new book, sales for A Noble’s Quest increased out of the gate. Some people are going on to A Wizard’s Gambit. I expect there’ll be more A Hero’s Birth sales coming up soon. I just wanted to share the book rank graphs to show what I mean…

Book ranks – click to enlarge

A Noble’s Quest is performing far better than normal. You can see several peaks in the last month, indicating sales and people who started reading it on Kindle Unlimited. Since the launch of A Hero’s Birth, you can see that it really hasn’t had a chance to dip down at all, which is fantastic.

A Wizard’s Gambit is also doing better than usual. While not as high as A Noble’s Quest, that’s to be expected. Not everyone who reads book 1 will continue to book 2 (which is a shame, in my opinion… book 2 (and book 3) is a much better book). But also most people take time to read the book. While it’s fairly common to see someone blitz through a book in a day or two through KU, I imagine most readers aren’t so fast. So just seeing a couple peaks for book 2 at this point is encouraging.

Demon Invasion had a single sale, driving it up from a very, very long dry spell (You can tell by the nearly flat line before the peak). That long flat stretch is what the majority of my shorter works look like all the time. I’ve had very little success with short stories and novellas. That’s okay. They’re not necessary reading for the series, and I understand many people just want the full novels.

A Hero’s Birth started with a sale, and has been trailing since. I’m… a little disappointed with the performance here. I know a lot of people are waiting for the paperback copies, as I’ve been having people tell me they’ll be getting copies at GenreCon. I’ve got a package to mail today with a copy of A Hero’s Birth and Scoundrels. I gave away ARCs and a few copies for my “fans for life” from Indiegogo. But for some reason I thought it’d do better in the opening week on Amazon than it has.

I’ve also sold 4 paperbacks this week, which don’t show up on these charts because the sales go through CreateSpace. This is an interesting issue. I’d really like to try printing one of my books through Amazon to see how it works, but I’ve heard the tools just aren’t as good as CreateSpace (no author proof, for example). It’d be nice to have paperback sales count towards the rankings to help rise up and maybe get noticed by even more people. But for the time being, I think I’ll stick with the system I know that makes my life easier.

Now, I’m not done yet. My wife’s put together a media kit for me, so once I put some books in the local book store I’ll be releasing that. Maybe it’ll drum up some more interest. And it’s just a slow growth industry, anyway.

Author Rank

I really can’t complain, with what has been my best week ever in terms of sales. My Author Rank has stayed high (for me), and I’ve got two conventions coming up where I’m expecting to do well. Slowly, bit by bit, my empire grows!

If you’re in the Guelph area and would like to come to GenreCon, it’s running February 9th through 11th. Lots of fun stuff to see and do. Make sure to stop by my table in the vendor area and say hi!

SkyCon and the Month of October

It was the first year for SkyCon in Kitchener. I met the lead coordinator, Rob, at The Round Table a few weeks ago, and I like the sound of the KW area having a gaming convention. He was eager to have authors there, too, and told me Ed Greenwood, the creator of Forgotten Realms, would be there. The cost of an artist table was pretty reasonable, and I told myself even if I didn’t sell any books, I’d get the chance to meet Ed Greenwood. I can’t tell you what a huge influence the Forgotten Realms has been on me. I stumbled across Drizzt Do’Urden in my youth, and have played so many Forgotten Realms video games over the years (Baldur’s Gate series, Icewind Dale, Neverwinter Nights [which ate MONTHS of my life because it had that amazing toolbox], Neverwinter… and I’m sure there’s more I’m forgetting). It’s just been such a huge part of my life that I couldn’t pass up the chance to meet the man who made it all happen.

So, let’s jump right into it, shall we?

The Good

The organization for the con was good. I liked the layout of the dealer’s hallway, right outside the ballrooms where all the gaming took place. The con also had pretty reasonable hours, starting events at 10am, which meant I could sleep in a bit. That’s important to me, because “being on” all day is exhausting, and cons sap my strength. As I write this, it’s not even 8pm and my eyes feel heavy.

I was on two panels the first day – and I don’t think I was supposed to be! It’s probably my own fault, and I misunderstood/misread something along the way, but I thought I was on a panel about DMing at 5pm. Then Tyler told me the DMing panel was at 2pm (Thanks, Tyler!). So I took part in that, and there was a good crowd there (Around 20 people, I’d guess?) for the size of the con. We discussed everything from running one-shots and campaigns, to dealing with problem players and players going “off the rails” (if you’re the sort of DM who plans stuff – something I try to do as little as possible). It was lots of fun!

And then Tyler informed me I was on the panel with him for game design at 5pm (Thanks again, Tyler!). So I THINK I was just supposed to be on that one, and not the DMing panel… so something to watch out for in the future. Apparently I will sneak into panels as a speaker if you don’t stop me.

I mean, I sat right in the middle of the panelists, with my books, like I owned the place. No one told me to go away, so I talked D&D.

The panels were well organized, with a hostess who had a prepared list of questions for the panelists before opening it up to the audience. I really liked that format as opposed to the sort where panelists sit there and make it all up on the fly. Those ones tend to have a single strong personality take charge, and you might not hear from all the panelists. With questions for everyone, you get to hear a wide variety of opinions and stories about every topic!

In terms of book sales, I sold 5 copies of A Noble’s Quest, 1 copy of A Wizard’s Gambit, and 1 copy of Demon Invasion. This more than paid for the cost of the table. I don’t feel comfortable thinking of success in terms of dollars made (you’ll see why below) but I know a lot of people think about it that way. So here’s some hard numbers.

A Noble’s Quest costs a touch over $8/book, and I upped the price to $20. I had been selling them at $15, but at Book Bash earlier this month I saw skinny books of poetry selling for $15 and realized I was seriously undervaluing my work. And if I don’t want to run Indiegogo campaigns for my books anymore, I need to actually start making some money on them. So $12 profit per book is way more than $7.

A Wizard’s Gambit costs around $11/book, and I also increased the price on this one to $25. The book is almost twice as long as book 1, so that’s probably still a pretty good deal.

Demon Invasion costs about $6/novella. I’m keeping the price of that one at $10, because I don’t feel comfortable selling a novella for $15. This means if people buy all three books at a con, and I drop $5 off for the bundle, I’m taking a $1 loss on the novella. I’m okay with that, since my profit margins on the other two books give me more cushion.

So, with the cost of the table, and ordering books, I walked out with a $35 profit. Any time I make any money at a con, I’m happy. My aim is always to recoup the cost of the table, because I usually have fun at a con.

Speaking of making money at cons…

Guess where I’ll be in March!

Ron from Kitchener Comic Con came in near the end of the day on Sunday, slapped this flyer down on my table, and asked me if we could make a deal again.

Last year he offered me a table in exchange for editing the website content. This year he’s asking that I take care of a monthly newsletter for the con.

No way was I going to say no to that! Kitchener Comic Con is the biggest con in this area, I believe, with over 9000 people through the door last year. Getting a table in exchange for writing? No brainer!

Bowtruckle!

 

I also picked up this little thing. If you’ve seen Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them, you’ll no doubt recognize the tiny bowtruckle. It’ll find its way into a stocking this Christmas! Wish I’d thought to pick up a card, because I can’t find information on who made this, but she had a lot of cool Harry Potter trinkets at her table. If anyone knows, please tell me so I can update this with a link to her.

If you’re into collectible card games (CCG’s), there’s a brand new one that debuted at SkyCon called Genesis. The artwork is phenomenal, and while I don’t play CCG’s anymore (not since I sunk way too much money into the Star Wars one in my youth), I heard from Nat that the game is great. Really nice people behind this game, too, so I recommend taking a look!

And as I already mentioned, Tyler was there, manning the GenreCon table. That’ll be my next con, come February! And, so long as the timing works out, I SHOULD have paperback copies of A Hero’s Birth ready by then! So exciting!

The Bad

I’m not sure it’s fair to call this bad, because I knew this was the first year of the con. I went in with no expectations of crowd size/sales.

It was pretty quiet. I was lucky that Nat, Tyler, Missy, Dave, and Jon all attended, because I had people to talk to and panels to attend all day the first day. The second day I got editing done on A Hero’s Birth, because I’m pretty sure fewer people came through the doors on Sunday. I could be wrong, but that was just the sense I got.

In their defence, they only came up with the idea of running the con three months ago, so considering the short amount of time to promote, it was REALLY good. I look forward to seeing how it grows next year.

The Ugly

I have nothing to add to this heading. I had a great time, especially because…

The Amazing!

Ed Greenwood!!!

As I mentioned earlier, Ed Greenwood was the big draw for me to attend SkyCon. Even if I sold nothing, meeting a living legend was well worth the cost of the table.

He lived up to my expectations and exceeded them.

When he got there, Rob was introducing him to people, and when they got to my table, Rob excused himself to go check on other things, leaving Ed and me to chat for a while. He’s open and funny, and when he talks to you, you feel like you’re the only person at the convention. Rob was kind enough to take pictures of us, which was awesome.

Ed’s interview on Sunday was well attended, and he engaged the whole room with insights into building worlds, writing, game design, and life. I can’t believe it was only two hours, because the time absolutely flew by. It’s an experience I’ll never forget.

Speaking of which, Ed left me flabbergasted when he swung by my table and picked up all of my books. All of them. When he talked to me the first time he said he’d be by later to shop, and I took that to mean he’d try out the first book, which was still amazing to me. But when he came back and pointed to each book in turn and said he wanted all of them… wow.

Steven Schend, who I know through Google Plus, and is a friend of Ed, said that not only does Ed routinely pick up books at conventions, he does read them and talks about them on his Twitter account.

And suddenly I freeze. Will he like the books? It’s often said that authors are discovered with a great deal of luck. I know it’s far too early to assume anything will come of it… but the mind can’t help to wander off, fantasizing about hitting it big and being catapulted into the life of creating books, games, and more for people around the world to enjoy.

It’d take an awful lot for me to give up my day job. Just the thought of doing something like that fills me with existential dread.

But what if I could? Would I take that leap?

I honestly don’t know.


 

And this is a two-part post, with the monthly update here at the end…

Aside from attending SkyCon, this month was insanely busy, but I got so much work done!

I told my aunt/editor that I hope to get the editing done for A Hero’s Birth before the new year, so I have time to order books for GenreCon. She started blasting through the chapters, and we’ve edited four or five chapters in a week. With nine chapters left to go, I’m hopeful that we’ll be done very soon!

Prototype 3.0 for Wizards’ War is almost complete, but I hit a snag. While there was a lot of interest in the game at SkyCon, I also got some much needed 1-on-1 time with Tyler, who has the price lists for game components. As it sits right now, a copy of Wizards’ War would be $180 for you to buy. BUT, after a flurry of discussing how to drop the price, we’ve come up with a new way of doing things that won’t change the overall feel of the game too much, but cut the cost of production in half. No longer will players each have their own boards. Instead there will be one huge board with a city in each corner. Instead of individual acrylic tokens for resources, we’ll do resource tracks right on the board with markers to indicate how much you have in storage. So the basic game play and rules remain the same, which is ideal. So I’ll be playing around with creating the files for prototype 4.0. No idea when that will be ready, as finishing editing A Hero’s Birth is my primary goal right now, but I’ll get there.

I started working more seriously on my RPG idea, Strongblade. I’ve been playing around with a character sheet layout, and revising the rules to take it further away from D&D 5e. I just hate the idea of reading through a 400 page tome of legalese to figure out how to make my world fit into the D&D framework. On the other hand, D&D is the largest RPG around, and distancing myself from it might reduce my discoverability. But then, when has that ever stopped me in the past? By the time this is ready to go, I’ll have a bunch of other stuff out, so maybe I’ll have a larger audience.

Yet another game idea entered my brain and refused to leave until I started planning it a bit. Unlike Wizards’ War, which takes place after A Hero’s Birth, this game – which might be called Escape Themat – comes directly from book 2, A Wizard’s Gambit. I don’t want to post spoilers for the book, although if you’re reading this and haven’t read book 2 after it was released two years ago… anyway, it’s a much faster game to play than Wizards’ War. You run, try to save halflings, and hope to make it out of the gates of Themat with your life. Play is determined by cards, and after talking with Ed Greenwood, I think I’ll try to make the cards multipurpose, so they have dice rolls incorporated into them, as well as locations, and other stuff. It’s kind of nice having a game that will be a smaller, simpler project.

 

 

So many projects, so little time

In some ways, I made great strides this month. In others, I feel like I haven’t done enough. Why? Let’s take a look at the list!

Fan Fic to Anthology

As I’ve mentioned before, I started volunteering as a Dungeon Master (DM) at The Round Table (TRT). The world that we play in was created by Tom Gofton, the owner of TRT and Lynnvander Studios. As such, I have no rights to the IP, and thought I’d just write a little story summary of the games I ran, so I could share it with the players.

Then there was some question as to whether fan fic is actually legal (it’s not. Written works are covered by copyright laws). However, after the good folks at Lynnvander Studios discussed the situation, Tom was more than happy to have fan fic for his world. I just need to sign a legal agreement, which will be done soon. Moreover, Tyler – also from Lynnvander – requested that I hurry up and polish the story as much as possible and submit it for an anthology he’s helping put out. So this 19000 word novella is off to a good home, and I couldn’t be happier with how it all worked out!

If you’d like an exclusive sneak peek at the first scene in the story, get ye to Patreon and select the $2/month donation option. You’ll see it there on October 1st!

DMing

How much work is it to create ideas for campaigns every two weeks? A lot. On our return from Quebec at the end of August, I spent a couple hours of the drive with my nose buried in a notebook, creating maps and descriptions for a dungeon crawl. The next session early this month followed up on that dungeon crawl, and led to the exciting conclusion where the party fled the mountain complex just before it exploded in fiery doom, a dracolich rising from the lava. (Dracolich: Dragon that defeats death by returning as an undead abomination that can use powerful magic)

Later in the month we were low on DM’s for our regular sessions, so I decided to try something new and run a campaign in my own world, with my own unique spin on the D&D system (more on that later). I churned out 7 first level characters for players to choose from, with the idea that I’d have around 5 players at my table, so a couple characters would go unused. This worked well, because it meant people could choose classes that were interesting to them, and everyone seemed happy with what they got.

And then I pretty much winged it, in terms of coming up with the game session. I mean, I knew the inciting event, but I had no idea what the players would do with it. It turned out to be a lot of fun, and instead of it being a “one-off,” I hope to run another session some day when we can’t run the normal campaign.

Editing A Hero’s Birth

I’ve made this project my primary priority, so it’s been swimming along just fine. No issues here. Promise! I’ve been keeping up with my editor as she sends chapters to me, and we’re 2/3rds complete!

Writing A Queen’s Decree

This … oh, this … Work on my fourth novel has pretty much ground to a halt. Why? So many other projects. I mean, I’m about 3/4 of the way through writing the first draft, and my third book isn’t even out yet. So I feel like I’m way ahead of the game. Also, I’m not sure I’ll have the finances to publish it when it IS complete, so … not high on my priority list. If the Empire’s Foundation trilogy takes off with the release of the final novel, that would bump this up the list of priorities again. However, with slow sales on existing books, and just not getting reviews from people who do buy books, I’m feeling discouraged on this front. The last short story I released had a grand total of one sale on Amazon. I hope the book will do better.

I’ll still write stories, but depending on how other things come along, it might just be at a slower pace, with no intention of publishing them unless something drastic changes. With each book costing so much to bring out, I just can’t keep sinking money into it without seeing some promise of return on investment. That sucks. I love writing, and if money wasn’t an issue, I’d keep doing it forever. But at some point you have to evaluate what you’re doing and figure out if it’s a good use of your time.

Creating board game prototype 3.0

Perhaps you remember the frantic pace I set in whipping out prototypes v1.0 and v2.0? I was like an unstoppable juggernaut of efficiency.

This, too, has slowed. There’s been a disruption with the board game developer nights, with the man who ran them looking for greener pastures. Since then, finding answers to questions has been much, much slower. I’ve still had some game testing and minor tweaks. I’ve been putting together a component list for things I need to make the game. I’ve been arranging game board and punch boards so they’re in a format fit to print. But the urgency behind it all has evaporated. This latest version has taken weeks to put together, instead of days.

That said, I’m planning on showcasing the game at my artist table at SkyCon at the end of October. So that at least gives me a deadline to have everything ready to go. I’m hoping the convention will help generate some interest in the game, which will in turn help with raising funds to make the game with a Kickstarter campaign. With the positive response I’ve had to Wizards’ War, I feel like it can do well. The trick will be getting enough people interested in it to get it funded. When you run a Kickstarter, you’re trying to generate enough funds to make a LOT of copies of the game – somewhere around 1,000.

I don’t know about you, but I don’t know 1,000 people. So it’s intimidating. But I love doing it. So even if the Kickstarter isn’t successful, at least I’ll have a game I created and enjoy to play with people I know. It’ll just be the most expensive game I’ve ever owned, with over $300 already invested into prototypes!

Creating RPG based on D&D 5e

When I started writing, the first thing I did was create a bare-bones role playing game (RPG) system. Now, the games we played that inspired the writing were set in the D&D rule set, but I wanted something that was uniquely mine. So I created classes and powers with vague descriptions that I could reference while I was writing. “Okay, the party is about due to level up after all that fun stuff. What new things can they do?”

When I DM’d in my world this month (as mentioned earlier), I decided to work with the D&D 5e rules in order to flesh out my ideas. I have several standard class options to choose from: Hunter, Druid (splits later into Mending or Wrathful subtypes), Protector, Aggressor, Stealth, Fast Talker, Wizard (splits later into Air, Water, Fire, or Earth subtypes), and Priest. But the system doesn’t stop there! There are hybrid classes for every conceivable combination of classes, and the ORDER that you take them in matters, giving you different classes. For instance, a Stealth that takes a level of Wizard can create the hybrid Shadow class. But a Wizard who takes a level of Stealth can create the hybrid Illusionist class.

And then there are what I’ve coined the Ultimate hybrids, which are effectively triple-class characters. The Hero, for instance, is Protector + Wizard + Priest. The Sieger is Hunter + Wizard + Druid. And there are more. PLUS unique classes for other races. That’s right. All that stuff I’ve mentioned so far? That’s just humans.

So when I say I created 7 characters for them to play, that was a LOT of work, figuring out what all those vague powers actually DO in terms of D&D 5e mechanics. So that was a major time sink this month, but oh so worth it. If you’d like to read more about that, I posted on Facebook about the game session:

Conventions

This hasn’t taken up much of my time at all, but it’s worth noting. Tyler (mentioned earlier) attended the Eden Mills Writers’ Festival and was kind enough to bring along my books. He even sold a copy of A Noble’s Quest! So that was a nice surprise. EMWF is more of a literary event, so I wasn’t expecting anything from that one. My wife predicted that maybe someone there would have a relative who liked reading fantasy and pick up a book for that other person, and that’s exactly what happened!

I’ve also signed on for two upcoming conventions. The first is SkyCon, which is a gaming convention in Kitchener at the end of October. They’re having Ed Greenwood as a guest. If you haven’t heard of him, he created this little thing called the Forgotten Realms. It only has something like 300 novels associated with it, a chunk of those written by my favourite author, R.A. Salvatore.

I’m going to get to meet Ed Greenwood. I’m so excited. As my wife would say, “NERD ALERT!” I can’t help it. This guy’s a living legend.

Now, it’s the con’s first year, so I don’t expect big crowds, but the table prices are pretty reasonable.

Coming back for its second year (after a hiatus) is GenreCon, right here in Guelph! Last year’s event was … quiet. They kind of threw it together without much notice, they had no celebrity draw, and so it had some problems. But they’ve been working hard at it all year, because they want it to be better. No, awesome! So this year there’s rumour of some star power hitting the con. I don’t see any official posts about it up yet, so I won’t post anything more … but you’ll want to keep an eye on this one.

What’s next?

Great question!

This month I’m going to continue editing as fast as my aunt gets chapters to me, I’ve got DMing at The Round Table, game design nights (with a new one at The Dragon’s south end location), I’m volunteering at Guelph Book Bash on Sunday the 15th, I’m running a Genre Fiction Writers meeting at The Red Papaya on Sunday the 22nd at 2pm, and that should be about it.

Y’know… plus all my normal duties as a husband, father, and researcher.

Onwards!

Kitchener Comic Con 2017

My last convention for the year is my favourite one… Kitchener Comic Con – #3KCC2017 (although I might be getting roped into another con in November – we’ll see)

The Good

Disclaimer: I was asked to help fix up some writing content for KCC this year, and was given a table in Artist Alley as compensation. Special thanks to Ronald Hoppe for that! Hopefully next year won’t be so chaotic leading up to the event, and we will have time to get everything cleaned up well in advance!

I showed up late, like I’m some sort of big shot celebrity (really, I drive a 2010 Dodge Grand Caravan that’s dying (seriously? Only 7 years old, with under 90,000km on it, and it’s dying? No more Dodges for us!), and my wife scheduled a test drive for a new (for us) set of wheels for the same morning, and being able to get places took priority). There were a few open tables in Artist Alley, and I was told to take my pick. I got a pretty sweet spot, front and centre near the entrance.

My usual way of going about cons is to set up my table, take a photo, share it on Google Plus (no Facebook on my phone, thanks), and get to work … sitting there, engaging people who stare at my books for long enough that I figure they’re interested.

The photo had to wait. In the first 45 minutes of the con, I sold 6 books and a poster, which is definitely a record for me. I wish I could say that the insane pace kept up all day, but at least there was steady traffic until about dinner time.

One of the students from my lab came down to check out the con. Although she lives a couple blocks from Kitchener City Hall, she hadn’t heard that Kitchener had a Comic Con, so when I told her, she really wanted to come down and check it out.

There were a ton of awesome cosplayers, and I had a great chat with Judge Brown. He’s writing a book, and flying high with it, so that’s awesome! I draw on other writers having fun with their writing like some kind of psychic vampire. It’s invigorating to hear about others having a great time!

I also saw Sarah WaterRaven, who I met at GenreCon. We had a panel together on writing, and she stopped by to chat. She was at KCC as “The Press,” doing interviews for the We Got The Geek podcast, and she wanted to talk to me! Normally something that momentous would hit “The Great” section at the end, but believe it or not, there’s something even better coming up! Even so, this was a major highlight for me. She also asked if I’d be interested in attending another con in November (and also mentioned Ad Astra, which I’ve heard about a few times now, and I’ll probably attend next year).

There were also LARPers (Live Action Role Players) in attendance from Alura Larp. Colton Schug stopped by to chat with me in the quiet hours after 5pm on day 1. If you’re in the Niagara/Hamilton area and interested in LARP, check them out!

At final count, I sold 13 books and one poster. Considering my usual 1-2 sales per month on Amazon, that’s some pretty great outreach. On the second day I also had a lot more people take business cards, saying they wanted to order ebooks. So if that happens, the second day will have been even more worthwhile. But I never count those sales before they happen, because more often than not those cards don’t actually lead to sales.

The Bad

I hate to say this, but I’m not sure it made sense to have this as a two day event. It felt quiet compared to last year. Aside from the hectic start I had on day 1, it was pretty slow the rest of the time, with a few little spurts of activity. After how crazy it was last year, I was expecting more people to come through this year. Not sure why it didn’t happen. From posts I was seeing on Facebook, they were getting attention from the media. Don’t get me wrong, I can’t complain after selling a lot of books (for me). I just expected it to be busier, and I heard some other vendors saying the same thing.

The Ugly

I don’t think I’d say anything was ugly about this con. I love KCC. I’ve attended two years running now, and it’s been good to me both times. I’ll definitely go again.

The Great

I had a milestone moment that I need to share with you all. Seriously, this is the kind of thing that writers live for.

On day one I had a young guy (I won’t mention him by name, since he’s a minor, but he knows who he is) approach my table and start talking to me about my books. He was really enthusiastic, and I had a lot of fun discussing my stories with him. While chatting, he would ask me if I had various things in my stories – demons, necromancers, elves, holy knights, ents. The only thing I said no to on that list was the ents, but I think he’ll be pleasantly surprised with the ending of A Noble’s Quest (The Empire’s Foundation Book 1), because I forgot there’s a scene where there’s something ent-like. Not an ent exactly, but probably close enough to please him.

Anyway, he purchased A Noble’s Quest, A Wizard’s Gambit (Empire’s Foundation Book 2), Demon Invasion, and the poster for A Hero’s Birth!

After the convention and unwinding at home with a movie, I checked my e-mail to find he’d contacted me to ask if he could talk about my books on his YouTube channel. He signed off saying he’s my biggest fan.

Seriously.

I have a biggest fan (who isn’t my daughter). I’m going to have to sit back and let that sink in for a while.