Review: Tow-Truck Pluck

Tow-Truck Pluck, by Annie Schmidt

Genre: Children’s

Rating: 5-stars

I don’t normally leave reviews on kids’ books, but I really, really like this one. We received it as a gift a few years ago when my daughter was little, and she loved it. I just read through it with my son, and he loved it, too!

It’s the story of a boy with a tow-truck who goes around solving people’s problems (and sometimes getting into some of his own!). There are many sections to the story, each a few pages long, sometimes with some cliffhangers that’ll have your kids begging for “just one more section!”

There’s a great mix of characters that Pluck interacts with, from Dolly the pigeon, to the Stampers, Zaza the cockroach to the Tootenlisp (a magical sort of shell). It’s great fun, and I look forward to reading it with my kids again and again!

Review: Game of Thrones

Game of Thrones (Book 1 A Song of Ice and Fire), by GRRM

Genre: Fantasy

Rating: 5 stars

People are often shocked to hear that I haven’t read these books or seen the show. “But you write fantasy!” they say, voices laden with judgement. After not enjoying Wheel of Time (I got to book 4 and stopped) and worrying about the slow pace that GRRM writes, I figured there was no rush. The idea of starting an epic series with an older author who’s in no rush to finish his saga just wasn’t appealing to me.

“So what made you change your mind?” you ask.

Well, a Boxing Day sale, if I’m honest. The e-book was available through Amazon for a steal, so I thought, “Eh, might as well give it a shot.”

I’m glad I did.

This is not a story for the faint of heart. Truly terrible things happen throughout the course of the novel, often unexpected and sudden. The dialogue is strong, and characters come alive on the pages, each with their own unique personalities. The cast is large, but they’re introduced in such a way that I didn’t have any problem keeping track of the major characters… even most of the minor ones. After quitting WoT when the cast ballooned beyond my ability to care about, I thought the same would happen here, but it didn’t. Maybe it’s because the story started out with a host of characters, so I grow to enjoy them all at the same time, instead of feeling like I’m not getting to see the characters that I had grown to enjoy over the first couple WoT books, only to see less and less of them as more “distractions” were thrown into the mix. I don’t know, but this series handled the large cast expertly.

But my favourite part of the story is the tension. You never know who’s going to make it or not, because important characters die. It ups the ante every time there’s a conflict, because you never know who’s going to make it out alive.

Now, I had one of the major deaths spoiled for me ages ago, but even still, the way it happened was alarming, and my hatred of Joffrey is without equal. That kid had better die a terrible, awful death at some point, because if any of the characters in this book deserve it, he does.

And I have hope that justice will be served in the end. After the crowning of the dragon, I have high expectations that the truly vile people in these books will meet the most terrible ends.

I think I’ll need to pick up book 2 very soon.

Review: As You Wish

As You Wish: Inconceivable Tales from the Making of The Princess Bride, by Cary Elwes

Genre: Non-fiction

Rating: 5 stars

Cary is immediately disarming with his charm and humbleness. The entire story of how he was headhunted for the part of Westley, right to the end and describing his love of his fans, was amazing. There are snippets from the other people involved in the film, too. It all came together to make a highly enjoyable read, and I can’t recommend it enough for fans of The Princess Bride.

The only thing I found curiously lacking was much on his time with Robin. I’d heard before (and in this book) how Cary had been smitten with Robin from the start, but if you’re hoping for juicy details, you won’t find them here. Too much the gentleman to kiss and tell. (Although the section on the most perfect kiss was pretty great!)

There were parts of the book that had me laughing out loud, and I really need to watch the film again, knowing so many tantalizing details about it to keep an eye out for.

Have fun storming the castle reading the book!

Review: Auckland Allies

Auckland Allies, by Mike Reeves-McMillan

Genre: Urban fantasy

Rating: 5-stars

Three low-powered magic users work together to uncover a conspiracy that threatens their way of life. The story is well written with a quick pace and enjoyable characters.

I like Sparx a lot… the non-toxic masculinity was refreshing to see. The banter between the characters was great, and there was a lot of action which always keeps me hooked to a story.

I will definitely continue on with this series, and recommend it highly!

Review: Crimson & Cream, by C.M. Skiera

Crimson & Cream, by C.M. Skiera

Genre: Epic Fantasy

Rating: 5-stars

This one had been on my TBR list for a while, and I’m glad I got to it. The writing is excellent, pacing quick, and characters interesting.

You’re in Jetsam’s head throughout most of the story, an orphan who has banded with other orphans to survive in the sewers. At night they come out and take what they need to survive.

This story starts out looking like a simple happy-go-lucky tale with a young protagonist, but quickly turns to a life-and-death struggle. With powerful monsters, an irate lord, and tenacious bounty hunter in his way, Jetsam has to use every ounce of cunning and speed he possesses to avoid a grisly death.

The twist near the end didn’t surprise me, but that’s okay. The story was still fun enough that I enjoyed it from cover-to-cover. I’ll definitely be checking out the sequel!

Review: Weirdo Company volume 1 by Ben Guilfoy

Weirdo Company volume 1 by Ben Guilfoy

Genre: Modern day military fantasy

Rating: 5-stars

There are five short stories included in this collection, and they’re all a lot of fun! When it started out, it felt like your standard military story that dealt with stuff that was a little weird. But that weird got BIG AND CRAZY really fast! The stuff Weirdo Company deals with is amazing! I mean, the titles of the stories probably give that fact away… but actually following the characters through it all is something else.

I was hooked part way through the first story, with a line that I loved so much I had to make a meme for it…

And it felt like the stories were anticipating my questions, sometimes. I’d be reading, and thinking, “Hmmm, I wonder about X.” When that happened, it wasn’t long before the answer came. That built a lot of trust between me as a reader and the author early on, so I relaxed and enjoyed the stories more as the series continued.

The fifth story had a couple hiccups in it, with what I think was a missing word, and a couple words that I think were typos. I hadn’t noticed it enough to bother me in the other four stories, and I was enjoying it all so much by that point that it didn’t bug me too much.

I will definitely be checking out future volumes in this series, because this was a great read!

Review Double Header: Dragon, and Harry Potter 2

Dragon (The Emerald of Light), by Dan Watt

Genre: Fantasy

Rating: 2 stars

I picked up this book at Kitchener Comic Con because I talked to Watt and liked the sounds of a “Monty Python Medieval Spoof” type of story. My imagination automatically went to The Holy Grail, which is a movie I’ve loved since I was a kid.

This is not that.

It didn’t even really remind me of Monty Python much at all. There were a few “silly” moments, but they were done in such a way that I didn’t even crack a smile when I read them, never mind laugh. I found the pacing far too fast, to the point that time and distance had no meaning. Add to that errors in punctuation and word use, and I found myself not enjoying the story. Characters would get a scene at one point, and then later their name pops up again, and I couldn’t recall where I’d seen them. By the end I had little idea of what was even going on, and certainly wasn’t invested in any of the characters. And this wasn’t a long book… didn’t take me long to get through. Part of it might have been that the main character, Burnwood, was utterly terrible with names and didn’t care about anyone he met. But he’d change his mind at random about something that moments before he’d been passionate about, and it just left me with a feeling of, “Why did this scene exist?”


Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets, by JK Rowling

Genre: Fantasy

Rating: 5-stars

It’s been about 3 years since I last read through the HP series, and now my son’s old enough that he asked to read them, and has been enjoying them immensely. This book doesn’t disappoint. As this was my third time through the book (the first time was so long ago it doesn’t count), I picked up on a lot of bread crumbs that Rowling put in place. It all weaves together quite well into an engaging story that both of my kids loved. After we were done my son walked up to me and squeaked, “Harry Potter has offered Dobby clothes!” So cute.

I know there are people who complain about Harry Potter books, but if they can capture the imagination of five year olds and get them interested in reading chapter books, I think they’re amazing.

Review: Gifts for the one who comes after

Gifts for the one who comes after, by Helen Marshall

Genre: Paranormal

Rating: 5 stars

Marshall has a way with words that makes the macabre and creepy beautiful. While it was a little harder to get into a couple of the later short stories in the collection that were 2nd person, and there was a story that I’m certain had a deeper meaning (I’m terrible at finding those), each and every story was written with graceful prose. Once I started reading, it pulled me along, demanding that I continue from story to story to see what happened next.

There were a couple stories that were difficult for me to read with themes of miscarriage.

I think my favourite story was the one that told you right from the start how the story would end, but encouraged you to read through, because reading the end of the story first wouldn’t make any sense. I followed Marshall’s instructions, and I understood exactly what she meant. And even with her telling the reader how it would end, I still found it surprising.

The variety of voices and locations was refreshing, and it was amazing how she could get me to want to know more about all the varied characters in the stories.

Well done, and highly recommended.