Slowly getting back up to speed

Well, things are starting to settle down now. After the great Expo (see previous post), meeting a local group of writers, and applying for an independent artist grant, I feel like I’ve got almost everything out of the way to start making headway on A Queen’s Edict. Don’t get me wrong, I wrote some this month. Just not as much as I’m used to, when I’m writing at full speed.

There are still a couple things I need to do… I have a talk I’m giving to my daughter’s class coming up soon, which should be loads of fun! Apparently my daughter told her teacher that I write books, and so she approached me at “meet the teacher” night and asked if I’d talk to her class. Pretty exciting! Also, I need to get my books in the Saskatoon public library, and MacNally books. Finally, ACX is misbehaving and not letting me check my audiobook production of A Noble’s Quest, so I have no idea how that’s going.

But once those final pieces fall into place, I should be able to finish this first draft. It’s taken me so long to write, with the long break this summer for the move, that I think I should be able to go through it straight away because most of the book will be fresh to my eyes.

Finally, friends in Guelph have launched their first Kickstarter under the name “Broken Things” and it’s doing really well! The game, Builders!, is a deck builder where the idea is to hire workers to construct skyscrapers while also sabotaging your opponents. It’s loads of fun, and even though my wife never plays those sorts of games, she tried it one night and loved it. It’s great fun for everyone, and if you’re into games at all, you owe it to yourself to check this one out!

Toxophiles

So this month was pretty awesome. Not only has my writing started making money for the first time since I started writing, but a fan group appeared on Facebook.

Seriously.

When I was invited to join my own fan group… no words seem adequate. It was surreal seeing “Toxophiles United” and watching the group grow. At the time of publishing, it’s up to 15 likes.


On top of that, Adriel Wiggins blasted through 4 of my titles and reviewed them all on her website at the same time as she posted an interview I did with her. It was fun, and I recommend reading it if you haven’t yet! If you don’t want to go through all the reviews, here’s the short version:

A Noble’s Quest: 5 stars

1100 Before Gods’ War: 5 stars (and her favourite love story)

Demon Invasion: 4 stars (-1 star for awful demon names… seriously. Who writes a story with that many named demons? I knew this was a bad idea from the start, even if I like the story :P)

A Wizard’s Gambit: 5 stars

All of that? That’s pure author fuel! If you’ve read my books and haven’t left a review yet, those things keep me going. Plus they help other people find my stories. So head on over to Amazon and/or Goodreads and let people know what you think!


New business cards! I gave away so many of them at the first two conventions of the year that I had to get more. I’m not 100% sure they’re worth having. For the amount that you spend on them (I only pick them up when I get a good deal through VistaPrint), and the number you give out with no bites, it sometimes feels like they’re not a wise investment. But at Kitchener Comic Con, one person who took a card checked out book 1 through Amazon, and liked it enough to get the sequel. I’m sure other people have used the cards, too, but maybe just enough to break even.

After giving out all those A Noble’s Quest cards, I thought I’d move on to the next book in the series. Once they’re gone, A Hero’s Birth is next. I can’t imagine going through 250 business cards faster than I can publish books, so this strategy might just continue on for the rest of my writing career. Gotta catch ’em all, or something.


I received payment from Amazon for January, and I have to say… I’m really happy with it. See, I made as much in one month as I did all last year through Amazon sales! Now, before you think, “Whoa! You must be rolling in it!” let me just say I didn’t make a heck of a lot last year… just $40. But still, I’m competing against myself, and only myself, so I’m really excited about this, especially seeing that I’ve continued to have some sales through February and March.


Work continues on both A Queen’s Edict and Wizards’ War

The book is closing in on 85,000 words. I’m really happy with how it’s progressing.

And I’m almost done the cards for the game. I’ll be bringing it to SkyCon Light in Kitchener on April 28th, so I need to get those cards ordered soon!

SkyCon 2017

May Recap

I sold a fair number of books this month through Amazon (7) across three countries (Canada, US, and UK).

Best month in a while

Additionally, copies of A Noble’s Quest (The Empire’s Foundation Book 1) sold out at The Round Table in the span of two days, which was exciting!

“Ryan, what did you do differently?”

I didn’t get to play, but it was still a lot of fun to watch!

Games. It might not make intuitive sense, but this month I ran a D&D 5e game at The Round Table, and one of the players picked up three titles all at once (that’s the spike on the picture above).

Also, play testing for my board game, Wizards’ War, has continued, and during one game I had a couple unexpected players. One of them was Brad (from Artisan Maille), who I met at KW Tri-Con this year. He picked up A Noble’s Quest at that time, and then when I ran into him again a couple months later at GenreCon, he picked up both A Wizard’s Gambit (Empire’s Foundation Book 2) and Demon Invasion.

So when we ran into each other at The Round Table, Brad sat down to try out Wizards’ War. During the game, he talked about the cool powers the wizards had in the books, and strongly encouraged everyone else to pick up the books. At the end of the game he said it was awesome, and that my series is quickly becoming one of his favourites.

I’m not sure I can convey how powerfully that affected me. But that night Nat, who was playing, and Mike, who was watching, both picked up the first book in the series. The next day I got a message on Facebook from Dave, letting me know he got the last copy at The Round Table.

So getting out and playing games with people and showcasing my world the way it started-games around the table-has generated interest. That sense of community is astounding.

When I brought Wizards’ War back in for play testing on Sunday, Dave was there for another game, and he scared the bejeezus out of me when he said, “I have a big problem with your book!”

In case you don’t know what it’s like to have Impostor Syndrome, here’s a taste for you…

For 7 years I’ve been writing. With my first book, I brought it out with my own cover art and hand-drawn map, only as an e-book because I wasn’t sure what people would think about it. It’s written as a stand alone story, because I didn’t want to leave it open to a sequel that might never come. I’ve had anything from neutral to positive responses to my writing, with the exception of one stranger who won a copy through a Goodreads giveaway and left a 1-star rating on Goodreads with no review. It was probably my fault for not clearly indicating what the book was about in the giveaway description… then again, I think some people just click on every single giveaway in hopes of winning something. But I’m always waiting for that person who hates what I write. It happens to everyone. There’s no such thing as a perfect book, and you can’t please everyone.

So when Dave said that, I immediately wondered what was wrong with the book. Maybe there was a fatal flaw in the story that I and others had missed. I was about to be outed as some sort of hack. A fraud. Everyone there would think my stories were garbage, and I’d never sell a book again. It was over. I was about to wake up from the dream.

“It’s too f’ing addicting!”

Right back in dream land. I don’t remember the last time I took such a huge sigh of relief. A day later he was 1/3rd of the way through book 2. He says he slept, but I’m not sure I believe him.

James (as Pellin) appears pensive as he marches across the table to assault my city.

After that I played a 2-player game with James, and he had some great suggestions for improvements, both to Pellin’s board, and the aesthetics in general.

I’ve revamped the items you can create with the smithy, glued on the new Ruins tile for Pellin, and made notes for things that I need to do for the final version of the game (like using a sepia map background, instead of the “depressing” muted colours).

The dwarves are hunkered down and set for an undead invasion.

I even squeezed in one more game at the end of the month with Dave and Jon at The Round Table. Jon had people interested in playing his games, so he left part way through, and we had a two-way match-up with just me (Arus) and Dave (Thrak). It was a close fight at the start, with a ton of dice tossed in those first couple rounds.

I made some more notes of things I need to tweak, reducing Arus’ powers somewhat (raise max of one zombie per turn from fallen enemy units, tinker with the speed bonus from the Skeletal Knight) and give Thrak a new power (his ice axe will immobilize any unit(s) it hits for a turn).


I received the first six chapters of A Hero’s Birth from my editor! It’s been a couple months since I’ve done anything writing-related, but after the good month I had in terms of sales, I felt energized and wanted to get it done as soon as I could. If you’re interested in a sneak peek, I shared the prologue over on Google Plus. From now on the game should require just small tweaks (I feel like I keep saying that, and then bigger stuff comes up), so I should have time to write again after finishing up the editing.

The first thing I want to work on is my secret project – digital bonus material for those who finish reading book 3. I won’t post any more about it here, but there’s some sneak peek material coming up for my Patrons at the $2/month level. If you’d like to see that, plus several other exclusive posts, you can be one of my Patrons, too! Just head over to Patreon and sign up.

Slacker

I’ve been reading Stephen King’s book On Writing over the last few days, and it’s fascinating. My wife’s aunt got it for me a while ago, and I had put it on the shelf, thinking maybe I’d look at it eventually. Generally speaking, I don’t like the idea of people who have found success telling others what to do. Put ten successful people in a room, and they’ve probably gotten there different ways. You see this sort of thing in the infamous lists that go around now and then with advice from writers who have made it … and they all say different things.

So I was pleasantly surprised to read that Stephen King doesn’t believe in a magic bullet. Anyone with any shred of common sense would realize that’s true, because if you could just copy successful people, there would be no unsuccessful people.

I enjoyed reading about his past, and was surprised to see him mirror some of my own beliefs about writing. I think he’s a bit harsher on some points, and I disagree that you need to write every day, or that you should read 6 hours per day (ain’t nobody got time for that!), but some of his points are interesting. He’s made me smile and laugh a few times throughout. His history is full of wild stories, and his ideas of a writer’s toolbox are fascinating. I aspire to become a good writer, even if he doesn’t believe I can ever be a great one (because I wasn’t born with the gift). But I’d be happy with good.

And I’ll admit to having more than a little envy when I read that he made $200,000 on the paperback publishing of _Carrie._ I can’t even imagine finding that sort of readership. It’s also impossible to think what I’d do if that sort of money fell into my lap. One thing’s for sure, I’ll listen to King’s cautionary tale, and not fall into drugs and alcohol! I imagine a big chunk of it would go into fixing up the house, or paying off the mortgage. Having an extra mortgage payment worth of money every 2 weeks would be like winning the lottery for the next 30 years.


I had a few slow writing nights early in the week, and when I sat down last night I’d only written 1200 words. Instead of writing, I set up the bones of a Patreon page, in case I felt like setting up one. With the thought of getting paid every time I bring something out, I was seriously considering firing it up. However, my timidity struck, and I realized I don’t even like to ask people to buy my books when they’re already out. “Buy my books!” posts are something I hate, and even when I do remind people that I’m a fantasy author, I try to do it in a creative way. Doubling that effort to try to sell books and find patrons sounded awful, so I think I’ll abandon that idea.

That took up a night that could have been used for writing. I was a little worried I wouldn’t hit my minimum goal, but then I sat down and the words flowed like a river. 3000 came and went with no trouble at all!


It’s hard for me to believe, but I’m up to 12 reviews now for A Noble’s Quest on Amazon. After sitting at 9 for so long, I was beginning to wonder if I’d ever hit 10, and all of a sudden I’ve had 3 in the last couple weeks. Maybe it has to do with the offer to give free advanced copies of A Hero’s Birth to people who review my first two books on Amazon? Maybe it’s serendipity.

At 4.1 stars, I’m so happy that people are enjoying the book. I’m going to print off some posters and put them up around campus to advertise that my books are available through the Campus Bookstore. Maybe I’ll find a few more readers that way.